Archive for March, 2021

How To Avoid Mistakes On Your Credit Report

March 11th, 2021

We have developed eight effective strategies for preventing mistakes on your credit report. We wish you much success.

1) Beware Of Debts & Credit You Don’t Use

Just as it is very easy to apply for a store credit card, it is also easy to forget you have it. It is important to remember that the account will remain on your report and affect your score as long as it is open. Don’t make the mistake of having credit lines and cards you don’t need. It makes you look more risky from a lenders point of view.

Also, having many accounts you don’t use increases the odds that you will forget about an old account and stop making payments on it, resulting in a lowered credit score. Keep only the accounts you use regularly and consider closing your other accounts. Having fewer accounts will make it easier for you to keep track of your debts and will increase the chances of you having a good credit score.

However, realize that when you close an account, the record of the closed account remains on your credit report and can affect your credit score for some time. In fact, closing unused credit accounts may actually cause your credit score to drop in the short-term, as you will have higher credit balances spread out over a smaller overall credit account base.

For example, if your unused credit limits amount to $2,000, and your regularly used accounts also have a credit limit of $2,000, you have $4,000 of available credit. If you close your unused accounts and owe $1,000 on the accounts you use regularly, you have gone from using one-fourth of your credit ($1,000 owed on a possible $4,000) to using one-half of your credit ($1,000 from a possible $2,000). This will actually cause your credit risk rating to drop. In the long term, though, not having extra temptation to charge, and not having credit you don’t need will help you budget.

2) Avoid Having Many Credit Report Inquiries

An inquiry is noted every time someone looks at your credit report. Don’t make the mistake of allowing too many inquiries on your credit report, as it may appear that you have been rejected by multiple lenders. This means that you should be careful about who looks at it. If you are shopping for a loan (finding the lowest interest rate based on your credit), shop around within a short period of time, as inquiries made within a few days of each other will generally be lumped together and counted as one inquiry.

You can also cut down the number of inquiries on your account by approaching lenders you have already researched and are interested in doing business with. By researching first, and approaching second, you will likely have only a few lenders accessing your credit report at the same time, which can help save your credit score.

3) Don’t Mistakenly Over-Use Online Loan Rate Comparisons

Online loan rate quotes are easy to obtain. Just type in some personal information and within seconds you can receive a quote on your car loan, personal loan, student loan, or mortgage. This is free and convenient, leading many people to compare several companies at once in order to get the best possible loan rate. The problem is that since online quotes are a fairly recent phenomenon, credit bureaus count each quote as an inquiry. This means that if you compare too many companies online, your credit score will suffer.

This does not mean you shouldn’t seek online quotes for loan. In fact, online loan quotes are a great resource that can help you get the very best rates on your next loan. It just means that you should carefully research companies and narrow down your choices to only a few lenders before making inquiries. This will help ensure that the number of inquires on your credit report is small, and your score will remain strong.

4) Don’t Make The Mistake Of Thinking You Only Have One Credit Report

Most people mistakenly speak of having a “credit score” when in fact credit reports often include three or more credit scores. There are three major credit bureaus in the United States that develop credit reports and calculate credit scores, as well as a number of smaller credit bureau companies. In addition, some larger lenders calculate their own credit risk score based on information in your credit report. When improving your credit report, you should not focus on one number. You should contact the three major credit bureaus and work on improving all three credit scores.

5) Don’t Close Multiple Credit Accounts

Many people make the mistake of closing multiple credit accounts in an effort to improve their credit score. If you close an account you need (for example, if you close all your credit card accounts), then you may find yourself in the position where you need to reapply for credit. Not only is this inconvenient, but the inquiries from credit companies can actually hurt your credit report. Additionally, credit bureaus will actually look favorably upon your credit report if they can see that you have a (good) long-term credit history. For example, don’t make the mistake of closing a credit card account you have had for the past 10 years, as this may actually hurt your credit report.

lf you have credit accounts that you don’t use, or if you have too many credit lines, then by all means pay off some and close them. Doing so may help your credit score, as long as you don’t close long-term accounts you need. In general, close your newest accounts first, and only when you are certain you will not need that credit in the near future.

Closing your accounts is a bad idea if:

A) You will be applying for a loan soon. The closing of your accounts will make your score drop in the short-term and will not allow you to qualify for good loan rates.

B) Your debt to credit ratio increases. For example, you owe $10,000 now and have access to an extra $5,000. However, after closing some accounts you are only left with $1,000. This brings you closer to maxing out your credit and in turn hurts your report.

6) Don’t Assume Only One Action Will Improve Your Credit Report

An example of a common mistake that some debtors make is believing that paying off a credit card bill will boost their score by 50 points, while closing an unused credit account will result in 20 more points. Improving your credit report is certainly not this simple. How much any one action will affect your credit score is impossible to gauge. It will depend on multiple factors, including your current credit score, and which credit bureau is calculating it. In general, the higher your credit score, the more small factors – such as one unpaid bill – will affect you. When repairing the score on your credit report, you should not equate specific credit repair actions with numbers. The idea is to do as many things as you can to improve your credit report.

7) Having No Loans & No Debt Will Not Improve Your Credit Report

Some people make the mistake of believing that owing no money, having no credit cards, and avoiding the whole world of credit will help improve the score on their credit report. In reality, the opposite is true. Lenders want to know about your past ability to handle credit, and the only way they can tell is by the score on your credit report. Having no credit at all can actually be worse for your credit score than having a few credit accounts that you pay off on time. If you currently have no credit accounts at all, opening a low balance credit card can actually boost your credit score.

Think of your credit report like a basketball game. The player who scores many points in every game is considered to be a great player, and will receive higher financial rewards than those who only score a few points. Those who don’t even play basketball have no scores to “report” to the game officials. In the world of credit reports, the debtor who scores the most points is someone who pays off their credit accounts every month. They will receive financial rewards through easier access to loans and lower interest rates, while those who have no credit accounts have a very low credit score.

8) Never Do Anything Illegal To Repair Your Credit Report

It seems pretty obvious, but plenty of people make the mistake of lying about their credit score or even falsifying their loan applications because they are ashamed of a bad score. Not only is this illegal, but it is also completely ineffective at repairing your credit report. Your credit score is easy to check and, not only will you not fool lenders by lying on your credit report, but you may actually face legal action as a result of your dishonesty.

Hello, my name is Zachary. I am the founder of CreditRepairNow.net [http://creditrepairnow.net/]. The mission of my team of credit repair professionals and I is to provide you with the information and tools you need to achieve a high credit score. Whether you are looking to take out a loan and want a lower interest rate, are applying for a job, or want to decrease your debt load, our strategies are designed to help you accomplish your goals. We know that people often have low credit scores not because of carelessness or indifference, but because hectic lives, or unfortunate life circumstances such as an accident illness or bankruptcy, can lead to oversights and missed payments. If your credit score has been negatively affected, we are here to tell you that no matter what happened your credit can be improved.

We encourage you to seek professional one-on-one guidance. Whether that be from the personal accounts specialist at your local bank, or from a lawyer, we want to point you in the direction of what is best for

Three Types of Credit You May Not Know You Have

March 11th, 2021

Every business has three types of credit: the Consumer Credit of the business owner, Bank Credit, and Business Credit.

Most business owners are familiar with their consumer credit. This is credit that reports to the consumer credit reporting agencies TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian. Scores range from 350-850, and credit is linked to the owner’s Social Security Number.

Most business owners don’t know that banks have their own internal scoring system for businesses. This scoring system is known as bank credit, or a bank rating.
This score is based on how you manage your business bank account. Having $10,000 or more in your bank account will give you a good bank credit score.

A business also has its own credit profile, known as business credit. Business credit reports to the business credit reporting agencies, Dun & Bradstreet, Equifax, and Experian. Scores usually range from 0-100, and credit is linked to the business EIN number, not the owner’s SSN number.

Business credit provides a lot of benefits. For one, it has no link to consumer credit, so no personal credit check is required, and accounts don’t report to the consumer agencies.

No personal guarantee is needed in most cases, so you won’t be personally liable for your business debts. Also, credit limits are 10-100 times higher than with consumer credit.

With consumer credit, just because you have an SSN doesn’t mean you have an established credit profile.

To get a consumer credit score and profile, you first must: get approved for accounts that report to the consumer reporting agencies, use those accounts, and pay your bills for those accounts, then and only then will you have an established credit profile and score for your SSN.

Just like with consumer credit, just because you have an EIN doesn’t mean you have an established business credit profile and score.

To get a business credit score and profile, you first must: get approved for accounts that report to the business reporting agencies, use those accounts, and pay your bills for those accounts, then and only then will you have an established credit profile and score for your EIN.

Entrepreneur.com reports that 90% of business owners know nothing about business credit. Business credit is usually reserved for established businesses, or those that meet a certain criteria for approval, and often is used by companies big enough that they have a CFO.

You can build business credit and get a good score QUICKLY! Having business credit increases the value of your company, and you won’t need financials or collateral for approval.

Any business can actually establish business credit, but the key to success is knowing the formula for success, knowing what steps to take and in what order.
Business credit isn’t highly promoted in stores, or with cash credit sources, so usually only larger businesses take advantage of it.

Credit issuers and lenders like it this way, because usually those larger companies are more established and have less of a risk of default, although it’s not actually the size of your company they look at for approval.

To get approved your business must pass a test that shows the credit issuers and lenders that you are credible, no matter your size.

If you pass this test and are credible in their eyes, you’ll be approved for business credit. Many times you get approved automatically by their computers without someone manually reviewing your application.

Business size and how long you’ve been open aren’t really the driving factors for your approval, but passing this test is.

This means even if you just opened your doors yesterday and have little or no revenue, you can still be approved with most business credit sources… as long as you pass their test.

You must have a physical business address, or use a virtual address. You’ll need to have a business phone number, preferably a toll free number, and it’ll need to be listed in 411.

You’ll need a business fax number and you should have a professional email address, and website. You must have the proper licenses for your business, industry, city, county, and state and you need an EIN, entity setup, and bank account.

There are actually 20 items on this test that will be reviewed, but you now know some of the most important factors that credit issuers and lenders review.

When establishing business credit, there are actually three types of credit you can get: vendor credit (starter accounts that offer Net 30 terms), store credit (revolving credit cards available in retail stores), and cash credit (revolving credit cards such as Visa and MasterCard that card issuers or banks approve you for).

The biggest mistake entrepreneurs make when building credit for their business is that they try to apply for store or cash credit first, and skip vendor credit.

But stores and banks will NOT approve a business owner for credit until their EIN credit profile and score are established. If you try to apply for store or cash credit without an established business credit profile and score, you’ll be denied… 100% of the time.

You must get approved with vendors first who offer Net 30 terms. After you use those accounts and pay your bills, the accounts will get reported to the business credit reporting agencies.

Then and only then will you have an established business credit profile and score. Once it has been established, you can begin to be approved for store revolving credit.

You should seek out vendors who will approve a business for credit, even if none is established yet. There are actually many vendor sources who are well known for this: Uline, Quill, Reliable, and Laughlin and Associates, just to name a few.

To start business credit, you first should get approved for accounts with these vendors.

Some will require you purchase their products first and some will have you make three orders and pay before they’ll issue you a line-of-credit. But all of the sources I listed will approve a brand new business, even if you have no credit now.

You’ll want to insure you have a total of five payment experiences reported before you even think of applying for store credit. A payment experience is the reporting of an account to a business reporting agency.

So Quill, for example, reports to both D&B and Experian. That means that one account will count as two payment experiences. Laughlin only reports to Experian, counting as one payment experience.

Once you have five payment experiences reporting, you can begin to secure revolving store credit cards for your EIN.

KEEP IN MIND, all applications will ask for your SSN but you do NOT need to provide your SSN on the application. If you do supply your SSN, they WILL pull your personal credit… and if it’s bad your application will be denied.

When you leave the SSN field blank, they’ll pull your business credit. Once they see that you have business credit established and at least five payment experiences reporting, then you’ll start to get approved for store credit.

Most major retailers do offer business credit as well as consumer credit. Staples, Office Depot, Home Depot, Lowes, Target, Walmart, Costco, Sam’s Club, Radio Shack, Best Buy, BP, Chevron, Amazon, Shell, and most other stores, offer business credit.

Some sources like Home Depot might have more stringent approval requirements and want to see big revenue and three years in business for approval of no personal-guarantee credit. However, sources don’t have these requirements, if you have credit established for the business.

WARNING!!! Do NOT put your SSN on the application. Do NOT apply for revolving store credit without having at least five payment experiences reporting to the business credit reporting agencies. If you do either of these, you’ll be denied or you’ll have to give them your personal guarantee.

Once you have a total of 10 payment experiences reported to the business bureaus, then you can start to get cash credit cards. Cash cards are those issued by Visa, MasterCard, even AMEX, and are cards you can use anywhere, not just cards you can only use in one store.

It’s recommended that at least one of your 10 payment experiences has a high limit of $10,000 or more before applying for cash credit. Dell is a revolving store source who regularly approves business owners with established business credit for an account with a limit of $10,000 or more.

Key Bank and Home Depot are two sources that offer revolving cash credit cards you can use most anywhere; many banks offer these also.

When you follow these steps, your business can have an established credit profile and score.

This profile and score can then be used to get you credit in your business name, regardless of your personal credit, and without a personal guarantee.

You’ll want to continue building business credit, applying and getting more credit, using that credit, and getting approved for higher and higher credit limits.

About the Author

Cheryl Risner is currently the CEO of SR Business Resources, LLC.

Cheryl is a business funding, finance and credit specialist. She has w